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2017 SLAS Discovery & SLAS Technology Art of Science Contest Winners

Grand Prize Winner

Karsten Boehnke, Eli Lilly & Company (Spain)

 

Patient-derived organoid cultures represent a new generation of experimental three-dimensional model systems for translational research, drug-screening technology and pharmacogenomic profiling. The image shows the complex morphology of a patient-derived three-dimensional organoid culture using confocal microscopy by merging several z slices (Blue: Nuclei (DAPI); Red: Structural integrity (F-Actin); Green: Proliferation (Ki-67). Read Karsten Boehnke’s paper “Assay Establishment and Validation of a High-Throughput Screening Platform for Three-Dimensional Patient-Derived Colon Cancer Organoid Cultures” in SLAS Discovery.

 

Honorable Mentions

Afshin Abrishamkar, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

"The Crystal Necklace" is made of crystalline materials produced from alginate, calcium, and triazole through a microfluidic device. The chain and the pendant are both made of crystals, nicely depicted in the image. The image is captured by a high resolution colorful camera using a polarized filter at 5X magnification on an inverted microscope.

 

Janet Brownlees, MRC Technology (UK)

This is a picture of human neurons derived for stem cells and stained with a nuclear stain, Hoescht (dark blue) and a marker for neuronal process Tij1 (lighter blue). Cells were cultured in multiwell plates for 30 days. Images were taken on a high-content imager (GE Healthcare InCell 2000).

 

Maria Papanikolaou, University of Portsmouth (UK)

Confocal microscope image of mouse astrocytes migrating from an optic nerve explant in culture. Co-expression of the astrocytic marker GFAP (Red) with a potassium channel (Green) appears yellow. DAPI (Blue) stained all cell nuclei in culture. I changed the black background into cyan to turn a scientific image into art!

 

Ana Reula, University of Valencia (Spain)

My image was taken with a Leica SP5 Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope from the Biomedical Imaging Unit of University of Southampton, UK. It is part of the images that I took during an Advanced Light Microscopy Course. The original image is part of an auto-fluorescent alga, and it has been modified simulating an Andy Warhol work.